Where Are They Now


Welcome to Indiana Prison Writers Workshop 10-week series of photo essays titled, “Where Are They Now”. We’re introducing you to 10 men who were once incarcerated. Why does this matter? The men featured have returned home, to our communities. They’ve done their time. They’re remorseful for the crimes they’ve committed. They’re from all over the country. Some are writers. Some are not. You’ll learn about their struggles and successes in short photo captions each week for 10 weeks.

Meet Scott H.
RELEASED. 3/30/2020. Incarcerated for 22 years and 8 months. Scott enjoys spending time with his family. He’s currently job hunting. He says his biggest challenge post-release is being alert and aware of scams. “There are so many scams out there: from computers to everyday occurrences, it’s crazy.”

Meet DeMarr P.
RELEASED. 10/8/19. Incarcerated for 4 years. DeMarr is working in the music industry and has released a CD. He enjoys being a father to a bubbly 6-year-old. He missed out on many initial years of her growth, but he’s making up for it. His biggest challenge post-release is seeing his family age. “It’s hard,” he says. “Real hard.”

Meet Danny S.
RELEASED. 2/25/2020. Incarcerated for 28 years. Danny tells us, “Although there are still many adjustments to be made mentally, I have been able to shift my daily routine quite easily because the flow of the outside world forces you to move at its pace, not at yours. All in all, I am content. I have a great job at a towing company in Kentucky. I own my car. I own my house. I have a great woman at my side. They say that adaptation is the key to survival and that is true. I was surviving, and now I’m living.”

Meet Corey C.
RELEASED. 9/5/2019. Incarcerated for 9.5 years. Founder of VaniTEE Creature Company (retail: vaniteecreature.net). Corey has built a business and brand. He received inspiration for his business while walking the prison track.

“I read a book titled: ‘Man’s Search for Meaning” by Victor E. Frankl. In the book, Frankl describes his own experiences of life in Nazi death camps. Frankl writes: “We cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward. Any man can, even under such circumstances, decide what shall become of him – mentally. But there was no need to be ashamed of tears, for tears bore witness that a man had the greatest courage, the courage to suffer.”

Corey’s biggest challenge post-release has been adjusting to current times: no mix tapes. Things have changed in such a short time.